Amazon Lines Up Satellite Launches to Take on Musk’s Starlink

Amazon Lines Up Satellite Launches to Take on Musk's Starlink
Photo by ActionVance on Unsplash

E-commerce giant, Amazon, has booked rides to space for the majority of its internet-satellite mega constellation under Project Kuiper. The company announced yesterday that 83 new launches will take off on 3 different rockets to get its future satellites into orbit. Amazon will conduct the satellite launches over a five-year period to stream high-speed internet across the world.

The contract has been signed in partnership with three other companies – Arianespace, United Launch Alliance, and Blue Origin — Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’ space company. 

Space Race

Tesla founder, Elon Musk, will face quite an intense competition in the affordable satellite-based internet market once Project Kuiper comes into the business. The concept of Kuiper is fairly similar to SpaceX’s ever-growing Starlink program — a planned constellation of tens of thousands of satellites also designed to provide broadband internet from low Earth orbit.

Rocket Billionaires 

The larger-than-life personalities, Bezos and Musk, will take the center stage once again with their respective companies expanding business into the internet market.

Amazon plans to launch its first two prototype satellites by year’s end. However, Starlink got a head start over Project Kuiper since it has already begun limited internet service around the world.

Also in the mix is Indian billionaire, Mukesh Ambani’s Jio Platforms–which said last week that it was planning to launch satellite-based broadband services in India in partnership with Luxembourg-based telecom company SES.

Too long? Here’s a one-liner: Amazon unveils Project Kuiper to launch its internet satellites over a five-year period, Elon’s Starlink program to face fierce competition.

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